Find a Meditation Group

Locate a meditation group in your state. If you are unable to join a local group, please consider our Online Groups.

Retreats, Seminars & More

Find the latest information about workshops, retreats and training opportunities in the US.
Continue reading ...

Why Christian Meditation?

Basic information on meditation in the Christian tradition as renewed and passed on by Fr. John Main and Fr. Laurence Freeman.
Continue reading ...

Sharing Our Practice

Support for local meditators who share the gift with Children and Youth, and with persons in Recovery, with Mental Health challenges or in Prison.
Continue reading ...

The World Community for Christian Meditation, which is inclusive of all denominations, shares a commitment to the discipline of meditation inspired by the early Christian Desert Fathers and Mothers, and John Cassian in particular, and as taught by Fr. John Main, OSB (1926-1982). Today, his successor, Fr. Laurence Freeman OSB, a Benedictine monk and Director of the World Community for Christian Meditation, continues the teaching. It transforms our lives in its twice daily practice and creates a community that constitutes a monastery without walls.

Meditatio Newsletter Plus USA News

Read it here!

Our Meditatio Newsletter allows us to share the journey of Christian meditation with others all over the world who are pursuing this practice. It is written, edited and published by WCCM volunteers worldwide. As displayed here on the US website, the newsletter also contains the USA Update,which inspires us and knits us together in community.

Lenten Reflections | Fr. Laurence Freeman OSB | Sunday

Jeremiah 31:31-34; Hebrews 5:7-9; John 12: 20-33

Life is one damn thing after another. Religious people often deal with that by building walls and ramparts against change and thereby produce a religion full of damnation and condemnation. Religion is meant to be an enlightened and fearless way of managing change on life’s inexorable journey to God.

Today’s readings begin in the Axial Age – that evolutionary period of human consciousness that gave us the Buddha, the Upanishads, Lao Tse, Plato – and the Hebrew prophets. It was a time of deep, irreversible change in how we perceive ourselves. Jeremiah saw that his people’s understanding of God and themselves – the ‘covenant’ as they called it – had moved from a tribal deity with submissive worshippers, who derived their superior sense of identity from that deity. Instead the ‘new covenant’ would consist not of an external Law but of one ‘written in their hearts’.

The upshot of this revolutionary change in religious consciousness was a new perception of equality uniting the whole people. Those who have experienced God in this way forever look differently at each other. Teaching about God ceases to be from the top down. Now, ‘they will all know me, the least no less than the greatest.’ Such a perception of equality drove Pope Francis to call clericalism one of the three great corrosive temptations of the church. It also drove Mary McAleese last week to challenge him sharply to put this into practice in an incorrigibly patriarchal church institution and to respect the equality of women and men at all levels of its life. Continue reading ....